Category Archives: Student News

Two Dunwoody 2015 Graduates are Finalists in Sherwin-Williams STIR Student Design Challenge

Two 2015 Interior Design graduates—Andrea Mbali and Jessica Curtis—are among the ten finalists in the Sherwin-Williams STIR Student Design Challenge.

Mbali and Curtis standing by their designs The challenge—open to all students in the United States, the District of Columbia and Canada—provides applicants with an opportunity to create and submit a color rendering of an interior space for a residential and/or a commercial design. The submission requires the use of at least three Sherwin-Williams paint colors in addition to a project statement describing the project and explaining how color was essential in creating the design.

Each submission undergoes two rounds of judging and is scored on originality (30%); overall design aesthetics (30%); best use of color palette (30%); and the overall project statement (10%).

“We always let students know about all competitions that are open to them,” Interior Design Principal Instructor Colleen Schmaltz said, “and we particularly encourage them to enter since we know that our students consistently show strong work. The students also know that winning a national competition is a significant addition to their professional resume and portfolio, and in some cases a great source of prize cash and scholarships. This is the first year two of our students have chosen to enter this particular competition—and now both are national finalists!”

Both Andrea and Jessica used part of their mini-capstone project—created in the Fall semester of their senior year at Dunwoody—in their submission. The capstone project requires students to learn and become fluent in design programs such as REVIT and the Adobe Creative Suite including InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator—programs widely used in the Interior Design profession.

“All of the studio classes and building technology courses have taught me how to design creatively and utilize real practices,” says finalist Jessica Curtis, “and [Principal Instructor] Nada Sarraff-Knoweles really challenged me to create a unique design.”

Andrea Mbali also paid tribute to her instructors saying, “Colleen Schmaltz really inspired me to enter my project. Without her encouragement, I probably would have ben consumed with day-to-day projects and schoolwork and not have applied. Nada Sarraff-Knoweles also helped me during the design process. Nada pushed me to push myself creatively and was able to tell me when things were or were not working.”

Practice made perfect for Andrea when it came to designing. “Throughout class projects, my rendering skills in REVIT have developed tremendously,” she said, ”and I now typically build all of my own furniture, lighting and other necessary structures instead of using online prebuilt models. I feel this gives me an edge because I am not limited to what the internet provides.”

Andrea—who hopes to specialize in Hospitality design—took the idea of a traditional spa in a whole new direction in her STIR competition submission titled “Felicity Day Spa.”

Andrea Mbali: Felicity Day Spa

Andrea Mbali: Felicity Day Spa

“My inspiration was drawn from my own experiences of going to spas and not feeling like they were cool enough for younger generations. Not everyone always wants zen,” Andrea said, “I was also inspired by my travels and seeing what the world has to offer outside of the Midwest. Everything here is so safe, and I love the unexpected and daring in design and fashion.”

Andrea Mbali: Felicity Day Spa Locker Room

Andrea Mbali: Felicity Day Spa Locker Room

Jessica’s submission—titled Flex Art Gallery and Studios—takes a more commercial design approach, inspired by real Minneapolis structures and landmarks.

Jessica Curtis: Flex Art Gallery and Studios Entry

Jessica Curtis: Flex Art Gallery and Studios Entry

“My project is a flexible art gallery and studio space,” says Jessica, “It started with being an adaptive reuse space utilizing the Bauhaus (Tap room) in Northeast Minneapolis. It incorporated different spaces where local artists could come and work and for the public to take classes. An expansion was then ‘built’ onto that to create an art gallery. The Art Gallery is an all-encompassing glass box façade offering a spectacular view of the Mississippi River and the Minneapolis skyline.”

Jessica Curtis: Flex Art Gallery

Jessica Curtis: Flex Art Gallery

Jessica Curtis: Flex Art Studio

Jessica Curtis: Flex Art Studio

Both projects are currently being reviewed and judged by Sherwin-Williams Director of Color Marketing Jackie Jordan as well as two celebrity judges.

A first place prize in both the residential design category and the commercial design category will be announced in early June. Winners will have their work featured in the 2015 edition of STIR magazine and receive $2,500 in cash.

Former Machining Student Honored with Gerstner Tool Box

Academic Excellence Award winner and 2015 Dunwoody Graduate Marc Svihel was recently honored with a Gerstner toolbox valued at over one thousand dollars. The box is estimated to be more than 50 years old.

Academic Excellence Award winner and 2015 Dunwoody Graduate Marc Svihel standing by toolbox

Academic Excellence Award winner and 2015 Dunwoody Graduate Marc Svihel

 The toolbox was donated by The Grant Wahlberg Estate–through Grant Wahlberg’s sons–who wanted it to go to Dunwoody.

 Students examining toolbox Upon further inspection of the box and it’s contents, Ron Underhill, Tool Crib Attendant in the Machine Tool Technology program, noticed just how valuable the box was.

“I realized that this box needs to be in a shop with a top Machining student,” Ron said, “not in the Tool Crib to be forgotten and gather dust. I am sure Grant Wahlberg would agree with that statement as well.”

Marc was chosen by Dean of Robotics & Manufacturing E.J. Daigle and Senior Instructors Brian Nelsen and Keith Jirak as a deserving recipient based on his high GPA, consistent attendance and desire for extra learning projects. Marc recently graduated Magna Cum Laude with an Associate of Applied Science in Machine Tool Technology.

YCAP revved Lakeram Seriram up for an automotive degree

 Seriram said he was intrigued by the culture of the Lexus of Wayzata dealership so he applied for a job. He’s been working at Lexus of Wayzata since August 2014 and his formal internship starts in fall of 2015.


Seriram said he was intrigued by the culture of the Lexus of Wayzata dealership so he applied for a job. He’s been working at Lexus of Wayzata since August 2014 and his formal internship starts in fall of 2015.

Lakeram Seriram is finishing up his first year in the two-year Toyota Technical Education Network (TTEN) program at Dunwoody College of Technology. As he reflects on the milestone in his college career Seriram says he’s thankful for the support of his family and the College’s Youth Career Awareness Program (YCAP) that prepared him for the rigors of higher education.

The mission of YCAP is to enhance the career opportunities of under-represented youth by empowering them to graduate from high school and obtain a degree from Dunwoody.

Seriram lived in Guyana before moving to the United States at three and a half years old. The 2014 Fridley High School graduate says he grew up observing his uncle, Motie Seriram, working on cars, which sparked his desire to pursue a career in the automotive industry.

During his search for the right college, Seriram and a friend attended one of Dunwoody’s open houses where he learned about the College’s small class sizes, emphasis on hands-on learning and how the YCAP program could help him pay for college and transition smoothly from a high school to college learning environment.

Since he is the first in his immediate family to attend college, Seriram thought YCAP would be a great option for him to explore the various aspects of technical education.

During the summer, YCAP students take college-level classes in the morning—like math, business, and physics—and in the afternoon hands-on technology classes in almost all of the technologies that Dunwoody offers. On Fridays, students visit companies to network with professionals in the fields they are interested in.

Seriram said during the summer months YCAP students get to know their instructors and other students—and it removes the “awkward stage” at the start of the school year.

“The YCAP summer program shows you what’s coming up in the future. You can’t slack off at Dunwoody. You have to do work here, I learned that my first semester,” he said. “I like the small classes. I don’t get drowned out by 60 other people, and the teachers are always listening and helping.”

Seriram grew up observing his uncle, Motie Seriram, working on cars, which sparked his desire to pursue a career in the automotive industry.

Seriram grew up observing his uncle, Motie Seriram, working on cars, which sparked his desire to pursue a career in the automotive industry.

“Lakeram is a shining example of a YCAP student fully utilizing the career and college-readiness resources the program aims to provide. He’s had perfect attendance and is actively engaged during YCAP events and activities,” said YCAP Program Manager Peggy Quam.

One of the YCAP activities Seriram participated in during the summer of 2014 was a tour of the Lexus of Wayzata dealership.

It was that dealership tour that solidified Seriram’s decision to enter the TTEN program. “I liked the environment. Sure, it’s a strict dealership, but I could tell that everybody was close and liked each other. They were joking around but still getting their work done,” he said.

Seriram said he was intrigued by the culture of the Lexus of Wayzata dealership so he applied for a job. He’s been working at Lexus of Wayzata since August 2014 and his formal internship starts in fall of 2015. “I get to see what I’ve learned at Dunwoody in the real world,” he said. “Each day at work is something different. One day I can be doing oil changes, the next day all tires. I like the thrill of things never being the same.”

“I get to see what I’ve learned at Dunwoody in the real world,” he said. “Each day at work is something different. One day I can be doing oil changes, the next day all tires. I like the thrill of things never being the same.”

“I get to see what I’ve learned at Dunwoody in the real world,” he said. “Each day at work is something different. One day I can be doing oil changes, the next day all tires. I like the thrill of things never being the same.”

Seriram said he hopes to have a long career at the Lexus dealership and maybe even open his own shop someday.

The next YCAP application deadline is May 1. For more information or to apply, visit dunwoody.edu/ycap/ or contact Peggy Quam at 612-381-3067 or pquam@dunwoody.edu.

 

 

 

Dunwoody students earn gold at 2015 SkillsUSA Minnesota contest

Dunwoody College of Technology students performed well again this year in the SkillsUSA Minnesota Contest held last weekend at various locations in the Twin Cities, including the Dunwoody campus.

Overall, 20 Dunwoody students competed in nine contests, including Architectural Drafting, Automotive Service Technology, Automotive Refinishing, Collision Repair Technology, Electrical Construction Wiring, Industrial Motor Control, Related Technical Math, Web Design and Welding.

Students medaled in five of the contests, with five in first place, two in second place and two in third place.

The following are the medal winners:

 

Architectural DraftingAdvisor: Paul Strother

1st Place: James Matthes

2nd Place: Chris Herd

3rd Place:  Celina Nelson

 

Web DesignAdvisor: Kevin Wendt

1st Place Team: Ryan Blaha & Eric Lorentzen

2nd Place: Joshua Eastwood & Nhia Yang

3rd Place: Casey Cross & Andrew Kinniburgh

 
Collision RepairAdvisors: Bruce Graffunder & Allan Zimney

1st Place: Benjamin Meister

 

Automotive RefinishingAdvisors: Bruce Graffunder & Allan Zimney

1st Place:  Harrison Reget

 

Related Technical MathAdvisor: Polly Friendshuh

1st Place:  Matthew Shevich

The National competition will take place June 22 – 26 in Louisville, Ky.

For more information about SkillsUSA Minnesota, visit www.mnskillsusa.org.

 

Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology students calculate circumference of earth using ancient and modern methods

 

Second-semester students Wyatt Spencer, Jake Blue, Jeremy Brunell, Joe Irey, BJ Klenke and Brandon Davis calculated the circumference of earth using ancient and modern methods.

Second-semester students Wyatt Spencer, Jake Blue, Jeremy Brunell, Joe Irey, BJ Klenke and Brandon Davis calculated the circumference of earth using ancient and modern methods.

After studying Greek astronomer Eratosthenes’ methods to calculate the circumference of the earth, students in the Geodetic & Controls Surveys class recreated the process using ancient–276 BC–methods and modern technology.

Second-semester students Wyatt Spencer, Jake Blue, Jeremy Brunell, Joe Irey, BJ Klenke and Brandon Davis gathered background information about Eratosthenes from the book “Elementary Surveying: An Introduction to Geomatics (13th Edition).”According to their research: Eratosthenes determined on the summer solstice each year that the sun was directly overhead the city of Syene, Egypt. It was noted that while looking down a particular well, one could observe the sun’s reflection was directly in the middle of the water. He lived in Northern Egypt, in the city of Alexandria, which was 5000 stadia (equal to 500 statute miles) from Syene. In the city of Alexandria on the summer solstice, he then measured the length of the shadow created by a tower in the city of Alexandria. Using simple geometry he calculated the angle between the tower and the shadow, and determined the angle to be approximately 7.2 degrees, which is one-fiftieth of a circle. Eratosthenes then had the distance between Alexandria and Syene measured by averaging the time it took camels to travel the distance between the two cities. He took that measurement and multiplied it by fifty to approximate the circumference of the earth. His result was remarkably accurate, differing from a commonly accepted value (24,901) by less than 100 miles.

Since the sun was not directly over the Dunwoody campus and it wasn’t plausible to drive the 500 miles to carry out the measurements, the class reached out to a forum called surveyconnect.com to ask for a volunteer to assist them in measuring the angle of the sun’s rays. Dan Robinson, of Little Rock, Ark. responded to the students’ request for assistance.

On January 16 at approximately solar noon, the students went outside in front of campus with a 24-foot pole—which they made by connecting six four-foot range poles. They held the pole vertically and used a plumb bob to confirm it was vertical. They then used a 100-foot tape measure to determine the length of the shadow cast by the range pole.

On January 16 at approximately solar noon, the students went outside in front of campus with a 24-foot pole—which they made by connecting six four-foot range poles. They held the pole vertically and used a plumb bob to confirm it was vertical. They then used a 100-foot tape measure to determine the length of the shadow cast by the range pole.

On January 16 at approximately solar noon, the students went outside in front of campus with a 24-foot pole—which they made by connecting six four-foot range poles. They held the pole vertically and used a plumb bob to confirm it was vertical. They then used a 100-foot tape measure to determine the length of the shadow cast by the range pole.

They measured a shadow at 59.9 feet from the base of the pole to the tip of the shadow. At approximately the same time—solar noon in Little Rock, Ark.—Robinson measured the shadow of 39.6 feet from a 25-foot pole.

“Dan’s participation was greatly appreciated,” said Principal Instructor Kelly Ness. “I think it speaks for the support students have from others in the surveying community.”

Using the coordinates Robinson gave them for his location (N 44-35-00 W 93-10-00), the coordinates of Dunwoody College (N44-58-22 W93-17-28) and a program to convert coordinates to geodetic distance (http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html) the students determined the distance between the College and Dan’s location to be 706.49 miles. With this information they were able to calculate a circumference of 24,383 miles. The value they calculated is similar to a currently accepted value of the earth’s circumference at the equator of 24,901 miles.

Although they enjoy the modern day GPS (GNSS) technology they’re using in their classes, the students are interested in additional projects using ancient methods of measurement.

“Next we will create a triangulation network similar to the method used from the late 1700s through the 1900s,” said Ness. “Surveying is a profession that will forever be tied to the past.”

For more information about Dunwoody’s Surveying & Civil Engineering Technology program, visit http://dunwoody.edu/construction/surveying-civil-engineering-technology.

Design & Graphics Technology students showcase work at annual Internship Expo

Eighteen Design & Graphics Technology students gathered on Thursday, Feb. 19, to display two year’s worth of work at the 2015 Design & Graphics Technology Internship Showcase event.

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The showcase is an opportunity for the May graduates to present their portfolios and to meet with prospective employers and internship advisors.

The 2015 event was open to the public and was held in conjunction with the Printing Industry of the Midwest’s Print Showcase and the International Corrugated Packaging Foundation’s (ICPF) “Best of the Best” Student Design Competition.

All three campus events had fantastic turnouts bringing in IMG_5735-smallDunwoody faculty, students, family members and local business professionals. Graphic design and printing companies such as Imagine! Print Solutions; Bluedoor Publishing; Liberty Carton; and even SMC Packaging Group out of Missouri, sent representatives.

Dunwoody faculty members and showcase coordinators– Timmreck, Manager of Design & Graphics Technology; Pete Rivard, Principal Instructor of Pre-Media Technologies; and Thomas Herold, Senior Instructor of Graphic Design—were also extremely pleased with this year’s event.

“I found this year’s event to be successful on two levels,” said Timmreck. “The first level of success was that our students got the experience of interviewing and talking with industry professionals… You could tell that by the end of the day the students felt much more confident in themselves and much more comfortable displaying and discussing their work.

IMG_5631-smallThe second level of success was seeing the attending companies really connecting with the students.”

Rivard echoed Timmreck stating that several of his students have already received internship and job offers because of this event, and “to see those offers on the table within days of the showcase is very impressive.”

The Design & Graphics Technology department will continue the Internship Showcase event in 2016.

For additional photos from the 2015 showcase and the “Best of the Best” Student Design Competition, visit our Facebook page.

Dunwoody’s Design & Graphics Technology department offers two-year degrees in Graphic Design and Pre-Media Technologies.

Dunwoody Design & Graphics Technology students take first place in ICPF “Best of the Best” Student Design Competition

The results are in! Congratulations to Design & Graphics Technology Students: Stephanie Burdorf, Charlotte LaCour, Dan Mueller, Finn Pearson, Noah Rabinowitz and Jenna Weiler, winners of the annual International Corrugated Packaging Foundation’s (ICPF) “Best of the Best” Student Design Competition!

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Featured left to right: Noah Rabinowitz, Jenna Weiler, Charlotte LaCour, Dan Mueller, Finn Pearson and Stephanie Burdorf.

The 2015 “Best of the Best” Competition was held Thursday, Feb. 19 via a live teleconference during the Design & Graphics Technology 2015 Internship Showcase.

Competing against Dunwoody was 2014 AICC Structural Design Competition runner-ups California Polytechnic State University and Millersville University, Pennsylvania.

The objective of the 2014 AICC competition– won by Burdorf, LaCour, Mueller, Pearson, Rabinowitz and Weiler last summer— was to create real-world marketing materials to assist with their college’s student recruitment and retention efforts. The final project was to be tailored to each team’s corresponding schools and stay within the branding guidelines of that institution. This required students to work with the college’s admissions and marketing departments to ensure the end result was something their college could realistically use.

The Dunwoody team’s project, titled “Recruiting Standee,” was comprised of a student recruitment mailing envelope/folder, a 3-D floor display to be used during college events and a “first day” experience box to be given to new students. The box, purposefully designed to fit inside each new student’s locker, included room for a Dunwoody T-shirt, pens, pencils and a USB flash drive. The Dunwoody team explained they also hoped the box would drive locker sales, helping increase overall revenue for the College.

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The “Best of the Best” competition took the AICC competition a step further by requiring the top three contenders to successfully “sell” their completed projects to a panel of industry experts. The teams were then judged not only on their project’s overall design creativity, but also the team’s ability to communicate effectively and exercise strong persuasion techniques during their presentation.

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Weiler, LaCour and Rabinowitz shortly after they discover they have won!

The competition winners were announced during the telecast, shortly after each school finished presenting. Stephanie, Charlotte, Dan, Finn, Noah and Jenna leave with a $500 cash prize and an incredible addition to their portfolios and resumes.

For more information on next year’s competitions, visit www.aiccbox.org/student or
www.icpfbox.org/Best_of_the_Best_Student_Design_Presentation_Competition

Zech Bradach and Ollie Reller place in Behind the Mask welding competition

Zech Bradach earned second place in Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and third place in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Reller earned third place in the GMAW division.

L-R: Ollie Reller earned third place in the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) division. Zech Bradach earned second place in GMAW and third place in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW).

Twelve Welding Technology students participated in the Behind the Mask Welding Competition sponsored by the American Welding Society (AWS) on Feb. 26. Around 100 students from Minnesota and Wisconsin colleges competed in the event held at Minneapolis Community and Technical College.

Students competed in several categories utilizing such welding processes as Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), and Oxy-acetylene Cutting (OFC). During the timed events students were presented with a blueprint and the metal components required to complete a weldment in 20 minutes. The weldments were then inspected by AWS Certified Welding Inspectors who scrutinized the dimensions, weld size and weld quality.

Each division placed the top three individuals to receive prizes. First place won an auto darkening welding helmet (worth $500) and $100 cash, second place winners earned $50 cash, and third place winners took home $25 cash.

Dunwoody student participants were: Zech Bradach, Ben Browne, Jacob Dommer, Lucas Hoglund, Curtis Mattson-Laurent, Max Mertans, Brendan Pliego, Ollie Reller, Austin Reuter, Kristen Schafer and Nikki Umpleby, Wyatt Werner.

Bradach earned second place in GMAW and third place in SMAW. Reller earned third place in the GMAW division.

Dunwoody Instructor Michael Reeser said he’s proud of his students’ performance in the competition.

“This is an excellent opportunity to reinforce the advanced skills that we teach on a daily basis and allows students to apply those skills in a timed event. It motivates students to produce quality work as it is scored by industry-certified welding inspectors,” he said.

To learn more about Dunwoody’s Welding Technology program, visit http://dunwoody.edu/manufacturing/welding-technology/