Category Archives: Industry Partners

Klein Tools provides supplies to Electrical Construction & Maintenance program, awards student with Outstanding Graduate Award

As Dunwoody students and employees gear up for spring semester, the College would like to take a moment to congratulate our December graduates as well as thank an important donor and partner, Molly Kujawa from Klein Tools.

“Molly has been involved with the electrical department for about seven or eight years now,” said Electrical Construction & Maintenance Principal Instructor Karen Schmitt.

“She always comes through when helping our students. On several occasions, she has provided me with experts who have demonstrated and presented to our class; when I have had students who couldn’t afford something, she is always very quick to help.”

In addition to assisting students, Kujawa also frequently donates tools and materials to the program. Just recently, the Electrical Construction & Maintenance program received several multimeters; numerous low voltage test kits and low voltage hand tools; and multiple display boards.

Klein Tools recognizes Fall 2015 Outstanding Graduate

Each semester, Klein Tools also recognizes an Outstanding Program Graduate. The award is given to a graduating student who has gone above and beyond during his or her time at Dunwoody.

For the fall semester, Max Orman was the chosen recipient.

Molly Kujawa from Klein Tools honors Max Orman with the semi-annual Outstanding Graduate award.

Molly Kujawa from Klein Tools honors Max Orman with the semi-annual Outstanding Graduate award.

“Max has proven to be an exemplary example of what we expect of our students,” Schmitt said. “In addition to a very good GPA, he has had great attendance and an excellent work ethic.”

During Orman’s final class at Dunwoody, Kujawa surprised him with a $150 meter; a rare, etched pair of linesman pliers; and the Top Graduate award signed by the owner of Klein Tools.

Orman graduated with an Associate’s Degree in Electrical Construction & Maintenance last month. He was recently accepted into IBEW Local 292, the Minneapolis electrical union.

CFMA continues history of Dunwoody-giving, awards Construction Management student with scholarship

Construction Management student and CFMA scholarship winner Justin Brastad The Construction Financial Management Association (CFMA)—a nonprofit organization devoted to enhancing the education of today’s construction financial professionals—has awarded its fourth Dunwoody scholarship to Construction Management student Justin Brastad.

The CFMA has a long history of giving to the College, awarding Dunwoody with multiple student scholarships and a generous endowed scholarship over the last several years.

CFMA’s support goes beyond financial assistance

“The goal of the scholarship program is to promote accounting, finance and management careers in the construction industry,” CFMA Scholarship Chairperson Michael Michelsen said. “It is our intent to improve the perception of the value and impact that a career in construction can have for both the industry and the individual.”

The giving doesn’t stop there: members of the CFMA Twin Cities have also joined the College’s Program Advisory Committee; participated in student capstone presentations; and have conducted several presentations to Dunwoody classes, focusing on topics like construction risk management and cash flow management.

Scholarship provides tuition relief for Justin

Justin, a Junior this year, says receiving this scholarship means a great deal to him.

“Being a college student and full-time employee is a huge task in itself,” he said. “On top of that, trying to pay for college and books can be overwhelming. I am very grateful for this scholarship and am honored to have been the one selected to receive it.”

The award will be put towards Justin’s remaining tuition at Dunwoody. Upon graduation, Justin hopes to become a Construction Estimator.

“I am on the right path to do so, but have a lot of learning to do,” he said. “I want to continue to grow and see how far I can push myself in industry. Wherever that takes me, I will be happy. I just want to be able to make a difference.”

HR professionals give students an inside look at the hiring process

Micah Thorson has been the President of Dunwoody’s Institute of HR professionals and hiring managers speak to students about the hiring process at large companies.Industrial Engineers (IIE) student chapter since it started about a year ago with a goal to connect students with professionals in the industry and expose them to hands-on experience.

As part of this initiative, IIE hosted a panel of HR professionals  from Liberty Carton, and 3M and a hiring manager from Target Corp. to help students understand what these hiring managers look for in successful candidates.

“The interview process can be a little more rigorous for large companies,” said Thorson, “we wanted to invite them to campus to find out what they look for so we could be better prepared.”

Writing a successful resume

Allie Rikke–an HR Generalist at Liberty Carton–mentioned that the first thing she looks for on a resume is metrics. She said, “once you start talking money, people start paying attention.” Rikke suggested that applicants applying for industrial engineer positions should translate their projects into dollars and cents to illustrate the impact of their work.

3M Sourcing Agent Amelia Simonet explained that she pays attention to leadership roles. “Stay away from words like ‘assisted’ or ‘helped,'” Simonet advised. She said she prefers to hear what the applicant took the lead on—not what the applicant helped with.

Doug Meldrum, Group Manager at Target Corp., suggested students should get involved in organizations and clubs on campus, explaining it was a great way to highlight leadership skills on a resume.

There are many clubs and organizations like IIE available to students in different program areas. Thorson encouraged participation in clubs because they “give students practical experience and build their skills to be successful in their industry,” noting that IIE is hoping to offer a six-sigma training next semester.

Preparing for behavior-based interviews

In addition to resume advice, the panel highlighted the importance of behavior-based interviewing skills, particularly for people applying for technical careers. In order to be effective in a technical position, you’ll need to be able to communicate with your team successfully, they explained.

Behavior-based interviews include questions that allow hiring professionals to learn more about an applicant’s behavior and soft skills in a work environment. This helps them understand how the applicant will work with a team.

Associate Director of Career Services Rob Borchardt is available to help students prepare for these interviews by conducting mock interviews and providing feedback on performance.

“Landing the job is all about your interview prep. There are some tricks I can give to help figure out what questions you might be asked in an interview in addition to some of the standard questions,” Borchardt said, “Practice is key, especially for those harder to answer questions.”

Learn more about the services available to students on the Career Services webpage.

To learn more about upcoming events in the Institute of Industrial Engineers organization, contact Faculty Advisor Janet Nurnberg at jnurnberg@dunwoody.edu.

Dunwoody celebrates National Rad Tech Week

Clinical Instructor Amanda Barker works with Rad Tech students on site at North Memorial Hospital.

Clinical Instructor Amanda Barker works with Rad Tech students on site at North Memorial Hospital.

National Rad Tech Week is celebrated each year by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) to recognize the important role medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals play in patient care across the nation. The celebration takes place annually during the week that includes Nov. 8 to commemorate the discovery of the x-ray by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen on Nov. 8, 1895.

Since the discovery of the x-ray, the Radiologic Technology field has played a key role in lowering the amount of unnecessary and exploratory surgeries and avoiding inappropriate treatments that inflate the costs of patient care.

Dunwoody offers a hands-on degree

Rad Tech students learn during their clinical rotation at North Memorial Hospital.

Rad Tech students learn during their clinical rotation at North Memorial Hospital.

Dunwoody applies its hands-on approach to the Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology by providing smaller class sizes and offering a variety of clinical settings.

“The instructors care about how you are doing and are more than willing to take time out of their day to go over anything that you are struggling with,” said second-year student Eryn Kivo.

Radiologic Technology Program Manager Dave Blake explains that class sizes typically stay around 10 students. This allows each student one-on-one time with clinical instructors and equipment, gaining hands-on knowledge of radiologic technology’s best practices.

Dunwoody’s clinical partnerships

Rad Tech students work with industry standard equipment during their clinical rotations.

Rad Tech students work with industry standard equipment during their clinical rotations.

Dunwoody maintains partnerships with 10-15 different hospitals and clinics in the Twin Cities area, including North Memorial Hospital. The variety of clinical sites allows students to work with real patients in every healthcare setting and situation–from level-one trauma centers to geriatric hospitals–before they graduate.

During the clinical rotations, students scrub in and work with real patients alongside Radiologic Technologists and Medical Doctors for an eight hour shift. Graduates leave Dunwoody well-prepared, knowing exactly what to expect in their field.

“Getting to learn and apply concepts to the real world in the same week is a great learning experience,” said second-year student Alyson Stumbo. “The teachers and instructors we have are amazing and very encouraging.”

Dunwoody graduates have recently been hired by top hospitals in Minnesota like Hennepin County Medical Center, Methodist Hospital, Park Nicollet Clinics, and Fairview Southdale Hospital.

To celebrate, students will be recognized for their hard work and dedication to the field with free lunches at clinical sites this week.

 Visit the program page to learn more about the College’s Rad Tech program.

Toyota donates additional 4 vehicles to Dunwoody’s T-TEN program

Students and faculty from Toyota’s Technician Training & Education Network (T-TEN) program are celebrating Toyota’s recent donation of four new Toyota and Lexus vehicles.A photo of a 2015 Toyota Sequoia 4WD; 2007 Tundra 4WD w/ TRD Supercharger option; 2013 Lexus GS350 RWD; and 2014 Lexus IS250F.

The newest vehicle additions (from L to R) include a:

  • 2015 Toyota Sequoia 4WD;
  • 2007 Tundra 4WD w/ TRD Supercharger option;
  • 2013 Lexus GS350 RWD; and
  • 2014 Lexus IS250F.

Earlier this year, Toyota also supplied the College with a:

  • 2014 Toyota Highlander AWD;
  • 2014 Toyota Camry;
  • 2008 Sequoia 4WD; and
  • 2011 Lexus LX57.

The total donation is valued at approximately $232,000.

However, according to T-TEN Instructor Lee Frisvold, these cars don’t stay pristine for very long; almost immediately after they arrive on Dunwoody’s lot, they are taken apart for training purposes.

Donated cars help Dunwoody students prepare for their career

“We try to make the program as real-world as possible,” said Frisvold. “So we take the donated cars and we put faults in them. Those faults are usually based on whatever is being taught in the class at that time. The students are then expected to be able to diagnose the faults—whether they are electrical issues, such as the car not starting, or problems with the car’s transmission—and then fix them, just as they would while working at a dealership.”

Frisvold says that because cars can only be disassembled and reassembled so many times, Toyota tries to replenish T-TEN’s fleet—in total—every four to five years. This also allows the students to keep up with the latest technologies and newest models.

Learn about the unique features of some of the vehicles by viewing the photo gallery below!

“Students also become very familiar with Toyota and Lexus cars before they start working at a dealership,” Frisvold said. “This makes them much more confident in diagnosing and talking with customers.”

Dunwoody and Toyota’s partnership continues to thrive

Dunwoody’s partnership with Toyota began around 14 years ago, and since then has produced nearly 100  successful graduates– with a majority of them still working at the dealership they interned at.

“Having a partnership with a top manufacturer that cares about the education of future technicians is very important to Dunwoody,” Frisvold said. “Toyota has helped us in so many ways, whether it’s through donated cars and tools or simply by creating a sense of a T-TEN community. To this day, they continue to help us keep on the cutting edge of instructional techniques and lab sheet design.”

Learn more about Dunwoody’s T-TEN Program.

 

 

 

Dunwoody celebrates the launch of its Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering at Zeiss

On Wednesday, Oct. 21, Dunwoody held an event at Carl Zeiss Industrial Metrology in Maple Grove to celebrate the launch of the College’s new Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering beginning Fall 2016. Attendees included the program Steering Committee members, prospective students, and industry leaders.

Building the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the ground up

Dunwoody strives to provide students with a valuable, hands-on education with the needs of industry in mind. With guidance from a Steering Committee made up of working engineering professionals and educators, the four-year bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering is no exception.

“Dunwoody’s Mechanical Engineering curriculum was built from the ground up by engineering professionals working in the industry,” Dean of Robotics and Manufacturing E.J. Daigle said, “They know exactly what they’re looking for when they hire engineers and they’ve tailored our new program to give students the skills they will need to be successful in the workforce.”

The following steering committee members were awarded at the Launch Event in recognition of their contributions to the program:Marcin Bauza accepts award at the Mechanical Engineering Launch Event

Bob Bach, Dunwoody alumnus and current Mechanical Engineering faculty member at St. Thomas University

Greg Barlow, Vice President of Human Relations at TKDA Engineering

Marcin Bauza, Director of New Technology and Innovation at Carl Zeiss Industrial Metrology

John Callahan, Director of Engineering at Polaris

Brian Sheposh, Principle Engineer at Johnstech Engineering

Rusty Steitz, Engineering Group Manager at TKDA Engineering

Scott Tolson, Engineer Manager at General Mills

Charlie Wennen, Manufacturing Engineer/Business Unit Lead at Wilson Tool

Dunwoody provides Degrees of Difference

The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering is a traditional four-year engineering degree but with an additional emphasis on hands-on experiences, including time in the College’s Engineering Materials, Mechanics and Metrology Lab that houses state-of-the-art technologies from companies like Carl Zeiss, Haas, MTS and Stratasys.

“This experience won’t be like a traditional university engineering program,” E.J. said, “instead of learning theory in a large lecture hall with hundreds of students, our cohort class size will be no larger than 24 students and about one third of our curriculum is focused on hands-on experimentation in the lab.”

 Click here for more information on the College’s new Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

Dunwoody Hosts Waterborne Spray Paint Training and Demonstration

Dunwoody’s Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing Department recently held a free, six-hour training session on aqueous paint systems for collision repair. The training was followed by an in-booth waterborne base coat and clear coat spot repair demonstration.

A photo of a Dunwoody classroom filled with event attendees

The purpose of the training was to inform the public—especially those in the automotive industry—the benefits of using, and properly applying, waterborne paint, instead of traditional solvent-based paint, on a newly repaired vehicle.

Nearly 30 individuals participated in the demo, including representatives from Heppner’s Auto Body & Collision Repair; Keystone Refinish (LKQ Corp); Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MNTAP); University of Northern Iowa Waste Reduction Center; Environmental Initiative Group; Kansas State University; PPG Automotive Refinish; and the City of Minneapolis were in attendance.

The training comes at a time when many auto repair shops are adopting the more environmentally friendly paint system technologies.

The Benefits of Using Waterborne Based Paint

Over the last few years, water-borne based paints have gained A photo of the waterborne paint expert talking at the event inside Dunwoody's waterborne spray paint booth traction around the U.S. and internationally. They have been proven to:

  • Produce better color matches;
  • Improve spot repairs;
  • Reduce solvent exposure;
  • Emit fewer air pollutants; and
  • Produce less hazardous waste–making them a popular choice in many auto repair shops.

Due to this shift in technology, Dunwoody installed a waterborne spray paint booth in its Collision Repair Shop earlier this year. The booth was made possible through several donations and a grant from the City of Minneapolis. Since then, the Automotive Collision & Repair program’s curriculum has drastically changed, focusing heavily on waterborne-paint application.

Event Attendees Learn Best Practices from Local Professionals

Dunwoody’s curriculum, additional grant opportunities from the City of Minneapolis, and waterborne paint application tips and techniques, were discussed at the event. Attendees were also able to participate in a virtual paint demonstration, which analyzes a person’s spray technique, rates their overall performance, and provides helpful feedback on how the painter can improve.

The program concluded with an actual waterborne spray paint demonstration inside Dunwoody’s paint booth.

Make the Switch to Waterborne: Learn MoreA photo of event attendees listening to the waterborne spray paint demonstration inside Dunwoody's spray paint booth

Dunwoody’s seminar was held in conjunction with the Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MnTAP) at the University of Minnesota; Environment
al Initiative; the City of Minneapolis; and MPCA’s Small Business Environmental Assistance Program (SBEAP). All organizations aim to improve air quality, eliminate waste, and better train local painters.

For more information on waterborne paint, contact Bruce Graffunder. For financial assistance opportunities to fund your shift to waterborne paint, contact the City of Minneapolis, MN Tap, or the Environmental Initiative Group.

Dunwoody & Mortenson Construction Win “Best Meal Award” at 2015 CANstruction

Team Donates 6,000 + Canned Goods to Second Harvest Heartland

IMG_2033-smallDunwoody’s Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department teamed up with Mortenson Construction for the 2015 Minneapolis CANstruction fundraiser—an annual event where participating teams build colossal structres made entirely out of cans of food.

The CANstruction team earned the “Best Meal” Award at the event, which was held at the Mall of America last month. The award is given annually to the team that uses the most nourishing, protein-packed food items.

Proceeds from the Minneapolis event were given to Second Harvest Heartland, the Upper Midwest’s largest hunger-relief organization.

There are over 150 CANstruction events held throughout the world each year.

Minnesota History Inspires 2015 CANstruction Sculpture Theme

IMG_8751-smallThe 2015 sculpture—designed and built by Interior Design and Construction Management students–was themed “Feast Like a Viking.” Cans of beans, tomatoes, vegetables and coconut milk made up the ship—complete with oars, a mast, sail and dragon head—while cans of tuna were used to represent ocean waves.

The CANstruction team chose the Viking theme because it represents the rich history of Minnesota. The voyage of Leif Erikson—who is often considered to be the first European to discover America—was recreated in 1927, with a final landed in Duluth, Minnesota. Journal entries from that expedition were kept and often detailed the crew’s difficulty in finding fresh fish and ripe vegetables.

This inspired the CANstruction team’s motto, which is “no-one’s ‘voyage through life’ should be limited by hunger”…especially today.

CANstruction Provides Students with Beneficial, Real World Experience

The entire project lasted about five weeks. During that time, Mortenson Construction and Dunwoody students not only designed the sculpture but also collected more than 6,000 cans of food.

Interior Design Principal Instructor and CANstruction Coordinator Cindy Martimo said that although the students were working with canned goods, the project did require students to use skills and best practices they would also perform on a real job.

“It required two very different departments to work together—especially on build day,” said Martimo. “Only five people could build at a time. So those who weren’t building had to provide various levels of support to the builders by unpacking boxes, passing cans, etc. The team had to practice time management, communicate with one another, follow a set of plans, and ultimately create the structure they designed.”

Click below to view a timelapse video of the CANstruction team assembling the sculpture at the event.

This is the fourth year the Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department has participated in a CANstruction event, and, according to Martimo, the students support and dollars raised grow each time.

“The event has really become a great opportunity for our students,” she said. “They get to be creative, design something and raise money for charity. In addition, their creations are judged by the very people who might someday offer them a job. The other teams out on the floor are all architecture and engineering firms. These are people that the students will be working with –or be hired by–one day. To have that kind of industry presence and to be able to add the CANstruction event to their resumes is very beneficial.”

Get Involved in CANstruction 2016

The Construction Sciences & Building Technology Department plans to continue the event next year. The project is open to all students in the Department. 

To get involved in CANstruction 2016, contact Cindy Martimo at cmartimo@dunwoody.edu.

 

A big thank you to this year’s sponsors: Mortenson Construction, Parsons Electric, Custom Drywall, and Ames Construction